Tag Archives: HORMONAL HAIR LOSS

PRP Female Hair Loss Study-Enrolling Patients


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PRP Female Hair Loss Study-Enrolling Patients

Dr Ken L. Williams of the Irvine Institute of Medicine and Cosmetic Surgery-OC Hair Restoration is enrolling female patients suffering from hair loss in a medical research study. The study is designed to evaluate the effect(s) of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy on women with Female Pattern Hair Loss (FPHL). The medical study is university based and privately financially supported by the International Society Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) and medical partners.

WHAT IS FPHL?

The term, FPHL, has emerged as the preferred medical term for hair loss in women. As opposed to the primary male hair loss diagnosis-Androgenetic Alopecia, FPHL is caused by multiple etiologies, and treatment options are considered more complicated. Hair loss in women negatively impacts women more than men with impaired social function, decrease self-esteem, and loss of confidence. In many cases, a accurate clinical diagnosis can be made and the hair loss condition treated medically or surgically.

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INCLUSION CRITERIA

The eligibility criteria are: 1) Female gender, 2) At least 18 years old, and 3) Ludwig II FPHL diagnosed by history, physical examination, and either biopsy or strong family history of female pattern hair loss as defined by two or more female relatives known to have a familiar Ludwig pattern of hair loss, without known disease.

UNIVERSITY SPONSORED HAIR LOSS STUDY

The study has been approved by the Office of Human Research Protections at the University of Houston to evaluate the effect of PRP upon the growth of the hair follicle. It is financially supported by a small grant from the ISHRS and is designed by Baylor University hair surgeon and principal investigator, Dr. Carlos Puig. In addition to Drs. Puig and Williams, also participating in the multisite study are Dr. Robert Reese from Edina, Minnesota; and Dr. Matt Leavitt of Maitland, Florida.

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HAIR LOSS INDUSTRY PARTNERS

This female hair loss study is supported by Cytomedix, the manufacturer of the Autologel  system that creates the wound healing and hair stimulating properties from PRP. The research is a multi-site study consisting of hair loss specialists located in the northeast, south, and western regions of the United States. The study is prospective, double blinded, and placebo controlled to increase scientific validity and reduce physician bias. The official title of the research is Pilot Study On The Effect of Autologel Platelet Rich Plasma Injections On Hair Growth In Patients With Female Pattern Hair Loss.

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COST TO PATIENT

There is no cost to eligible patients and no reimbursement is available for enrolling in the study. If the study demonstrates a significant difference between the placebo and study group, all patients in the placebo group will receive without charge PRP therapy to induce hair growth.

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CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are interested in participating in this medical study, and if you have been under the care of a dermatologist or hair loss specialist, you may be eligible to participate in this hair loss study. Your contact is Jackie Kusinsky at Jackie@iimcs.org or call (949) 333-2999.

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Testosterone Replacement Therapy Linked to Hair Loss


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A recent study released in the May issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine revealed the compliance rate for taking Testosterone Replacement therapy (TRT) is low in hypogonadal males. The study showed that by six (6) months of therapy only 35 % of male patients had continued on their medication. At twelve (12) months, the adherence rate had dropped to 15.4%. So what did we learn from this study ? Men are bad when it comes to taking medication.

Those numbers don’t surprise physicians who engage in hair loss and hair restoration procedures and treatments. Patients who fail to take physician prescribed medications, such as DHT blockers and TRT is a common problem.  Patients that have purchased and used illegal anabolic substances from nutrition sports stores are even more difficult to treat.  These patients often times present, unknowingly, with clinical findings of Anabolic Steroid abuse. Hair loss patients using anabolic steroids can also present with side effects including fatigued, erectile dysfunction,  poor libido, and low sex drive.

For the average medical doctor, the suspicion of underlying illegal anabolic steroid (AS) use as a cause for the patient’s subjective complaints often goes undetected. In patients who are no longer cycling on AS,  the development of  Anabolic Steroid Induced Hypogonadism (ASIH) is common unless the patient goes on another cycle of AS.

bald bb6Doctors often miss the correct diagnosis because they fail to ask the right questions, or patients are too embarrassed to offer this medical information during their office visit. The situation is only made worse because of inadequate training and knowledge of physicians in treating patients with ASIH from anabolic steroid use.

Most practicing physicians don’t understand  anabolic steroid use or the use of testosterone because physicians are taught early in medical school and residency to avoid these trouble causing and drug abusing patients. It is critical that patients be given direct instructions by healthcare providers about the serious side effects of steroid use.

Only a handful of physicians are engaged in evaluating the endocrine functions of their patients, and an even lesser amount of physicians have any idea of the side effects associated with steroid or non-physician prescribed testosterone. These side effects include hair loss, testicular atrophy, gynecomastia, lipid and liver abnormalities, and an increase in red blood cells called polycythemia.

Hair loss occurs for men and women who use testosterone or anabolic steroids because of the increase chemical conversion in the body of Testosterone to another hormone called, Dihydrotestosterone (DHT). During the metabolism or breakdown of  Testosterone, a equivalent increase in conversion to DHT occurs. This hormone has been known for over three(3) to four (4) decades to cause hair loss.

So what should a hair loss patient do when they have taken non-physician prescribed steroids?  Hair Restoration surgeon, Dr. Ken Williams of the Irvine Institute of Medicine and Cosmetic Surgery, states, “ Being honest with your doctor and obtaining medical care by a physician who is familiar with treating hair loss patients with hypogonadal symptoms is paramount.”

Williams adds,  “It is vital to have a comprehensive physical and endocrine evaluation. Baseline blood tests such as a PSA, Testosterone, CBC, and DHT are critical.  Routine office visits in time will eventually reestablish normal hormone levels, libido, and stabilize hair loss.

Patients with a history of steroid use and who suffer from hair loss can call Dr. Williams at his office at 949-333-2999 for a medical consultation and evaluation.

The Difference Between Male & Female Hair Loss


male-female2-300x227Many people believe female pattern hair loss is the same disease as male pattern hair loss, and  the hair loss pattern just looks different in women. In the last decades, though, the discussion between hair restoration surgeons in the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) has focused on the reality these two separate diseases or problems exists. Today many ISHRS physicians hypothesize  there are two different disease entities because their natural history (epidemiology) is so different.Many hair restoration surgery specialists think Female Androgenetic Alopecia is a misnomer and prefer the term Congenital Female Pattern Hair

PROMOTING PUBLIC AWARENESS-CARLOS PUIG

Promoting public awareness of female hair loss to the lay pubic and medical doctors is no easy matter. One particular physician, though, leading the effort is Carlos Puig , of Houston, Texas.  His tireless efforts to bring public attention to this medical condition is applauded and deeply appreciated. He is the founding member and current President of the ISHRS.  He is a world-renowned hair  restoration surgeon and probably the most knowledgeable hair specialist on female hair loss.

On a regular basis he leads an international effort to teach physicians about female hair loss and surgical restoration.  His hair restoration course, “Cowgirl Hair Loss Workshop,”  is an excellent compilation of his knowledge as well as featured hair surgeons from around the globe.   His below referenced chart comparison illustrates the differences between hair loss in men and women. We commend Dr. Puig for his efforts to bring hair surgical and medical restoration options to female hair loss suffers.

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**Chart adopted from Dr. Puig’s web site: www.hairrestorationhouston.com

HORMONE, STRESS, GENETICS ?

In some women with a genetic predisposition to hair loss, a group of hormones called androgens interferes with the growth cycle of the hair. These androgen hormones-testosterone, Androsteinedione, and Dihydrotestosterone (DHT)- are dominant hormones in men, but are present in women to a much lesser degree. In some women, hair loss may be due to the action of androgens on the hair follicles.

Hair grows at one-half inch per month and the growth phase can lasts two to six years. With yet-to-be discovered physiologic signals, the hair goes into a resting phase for a period of time, then the hair follicle falls out and a new follicle starts the process all over again.

In women who are genetically susceptible, when the testosterone comes in contact with enzymes residing in the hair cell, it is converted into the more potent androgen DHT, which then binds with receptors deep within the hair follicle. Over time, DHT in the hair follicle alters the natural resting and growth phases of the hair. Some of the hair follicles eventually die, while others stop continuing healthy hair growth.

webmd_rf_photo_of_hair_loss_chartThe term ‘androgenic alopecia’ in women is often referred to “female pattern hair loss.” It is a broader term that encompasses many possible causes of hair loss in women. Androgenic alopecia is caused by factors related to the actions of hormones, e.g., ovarian cysts, use of high androgen index birth control pills, pregnancy, and menopause. Just like in men, DHT and heredity plays a role in this disease.

In men, the pattern of hair loss is distinct whereas, women have a diffuse thinning of their hair. Female pattern balding affects circumferentially the whole top of the head with preservation of the frontal hairline. Men rarely have diffuse thinning and the frontal hair line is usually  loss to balding.

The science of female balding remains not entirely  understood.  Genetic codes and other factors plays a role in hair loss in women and remains a challenge to doctors and patients alike.

Celebrity Female Hair Loss: Tabatha Coffey Uses Viviscal


Recently actress Reese Witherspoon publicly announced she uses Viviscal to protect her hair against thinning. Actress Finola Hughes  stated in an interview, “Either the stress or the hormones had a huge effect on my hair and it started to come out in clumps, and I lost a lot of the front volume of it. I didn’t know what to do.”  She has since started taking Viviscal and  has become the public spokeswoman for Viviscal’s hair care and medication line that aids in growing healthier and thicker hair.

Hair transplant surgeon Dr. Ken Williams of Irvine, California says, “Viviscal is a scientifically based product that helps decrease thinning hair. ISHRS physicians and myself have been recommending it for sometime.  It is a natural dietary supplement and safe for both men and women to use.  As a physician, I support Viviscal as a science based product with clinical studies  supporting its use for promoting hair growth.

Look Out Kim Kardashian: Divorce Causes Hair Loss in Women


Kim Kardashian filed for divorce from husband Kris Humpfries on Monday, October 31, 2011. Even though Kim and Kris were only married for 72 days getting divorced is tough.  After filing couples must begin splitting their finances, property, and kids — all of these factors can lead to high levels of stress. According to a new study, all of that stress can lead to increased hair loss in divorced women.

Dr. Bahman Guyuron, the study’s lead author, found that women who have had multiple marriages (including widows and divorcees) suffer more hair loss than those who are happily married. In men, marital status did not appear to impact hair loss patterns; genetics and excessive smoking were the top factors. He analyzed the lifestyles and hair patterns of 66 identical male twins and 84 female twins to determine which external factors contribute to hair loss.

The study, which was presented at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons‘ annual conference in Denver, also revealed that other external factors could contribute to hair loss in women. In particular, sleeping more than eight hours per day, excessive smoking and sun exposure can increase your risk.

So what can women do to combat hair loss? Hair loss surgeon Dr. Ken Williams of OC Hair Restoration Center in Irvine, California recommends “…common sense and advice such as routine exercise, moderation of alcohol and absolutely no tobacco products. If a patient’s stress is too overwhelming then consider seeing a counselor or pharmacologic support by seeing your primary care physician or mental health expert. Hair loss has no common cure but Minoxidil twice daily helps maintain the health of the hair follicle.”

Jason Alexander Talks About Hair Loss and Toupee


The Daily Mail reports on Jason Alexander‘s recent photos on Twitter of him sporting a new toupee:

He raised eyebrows after stepping out with a thicker head of hair last week.

And after many questions from his curious fans, actor Jason Alexander has taken to his Twitter to explain the mystery of his reappearing locks of hair.

Alexander plays the  “short, stocky,slow-witted, bald man” character, George Costanza, in the great American comdey sitcom Seinfeld.  As this character he constantly is trying to find miracle cures for his balding head. But actor Jason Alexander was living his alter-ego’s dream after debuting a new look the day before his birthday.

Jason grinned as he showed off his luxurious locks as he celebrated his  52nd year by attending a charity poker tournament in Los Angeles. Amazingly sporting a more youthful look, it means Jason has more hair in his 50’s than he had when he played George in his 30’s. The 52-year-old Seinfeld star admitted he is indeed wearing a hairpiece and went on to detail his long battle to address his balding look.

‘The way my hair has receded in the last two years was best defined as dorky,’ he wrote.  ‘I started balding at age 17 and after first being sad, I really embraced it. I was always cast older than my actual age which generally meant better roles.’

‘Also, there was a practical element – onstage and even to a degree on film, my head had become a big beacon, reflecting light in a very obvious and distracting way. My wife and I discussed it and came up with 3 options – do nothing and accept it; shave my head (but I thought that might limit my castability even more) or put some hair back.’

‘I thought about grafts or implants but frankly didn’t trust the results would be good enough and also wanted to retain the option of playing truly bald characters. So I began looking for a hair system. What you see on my head is a really good, semi-permanent hairpiece. By semi-permanent I mean that I can wear it constantly for weeks at a time, if I so choose. I can swim, shower, work out – whatever. It stays on. The reason it looks thin is that I challenged my designer to make me a piece that would look very similar to the way I did 10 years ago. So, it looks like a guy who is losing his hair and isn’t an artificial mop of hair that I never had. So yes, I’m still bald and yes, just like others in my profession who have to either wear make-up or dye their hair or undergo surgery, I now do a little something. It’s honestly no big deal for me and hope it’s not for you either.’

“Hair loss is a serious issue facing many people worldwide. I see teenagers, adults and men in their 60’s who want a more youthful appearance to their face with surgery,” say hair transplant surgeon Dr. Ken Williams  of Irvine, California. Williams adds, “Jason does have advance hair loss and hair transplantation could have been performed to give him a more youthful appearance with his own natural hair.  My own hair loss was near Jason’s and I was able to restore a significant amount back to my frontal hairline. I can relate to his need to restore his hairline”

Real deal:  Alexander showing off his real locks in a newly-released picture of him graduating from Livingston High School in New Jersey back in 1977